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Athletes

Conor
Dwyer
United States of AmericaUnited States of America, USA
Swimming

Biography

Further Personal Information

Date of birth
10 January 1989
Height
195 cm
Residence
Los Angeles, CA, USA
Languages
English
Higher education
Sport Management - University of Florida: Gainesville, FL, USA

Sport Specific Information

When and where did you begin this sport?
He first tried swimming at age two, and began competing at age seven.
Why this sport?
"My grandmother would take about 20 of her grandchildren to the pool every Sunday and she called us her swim team. My family was always around water and having fun."

General Interest

Nicknames
Diddy (chicagotribune.com, 09 Aug 2016)
Most influential person in career
His family. (usaswimming.org, 30 Jul 2017)
Hero / Idol
US swimmer Michael Phelps. (ABS-CBN Lifestyle YouTube channel, 17 Apr 2019)
Injuries
He suffered a head injury from surfing and required eight stitches in April 2019. (Instagram profile, 08 Apr 2019)

He underwent deviated septum [nose] surgery in 2014. (olympictalk.nbcsports.com, 04 Nov 2014)
Awards and honours
He was named the 2010 National Collegiate Athletic Association [NCAA] Male Swimmer of the Year in the United States of America. (Facebook page, 22 May 2017)

In 2009 and 2010 he was named the Southeastern Conference [SEC] Male Swimmer of the Year in the United States of America. (archive.chicagobreakingsports.com, 22 Feb 2011)

He won the Commissioner's Trophy for the High Point Award in 2009 and 2010. (articles.orlandosentinel.com, 26 Feb 2011)
Famous relatives
His mother Jeanne was an All-American swimmer at Florida State University in Tallahassee, FL, United States of America. His partner Kelsey Merritt is a US-Filipino model. (inquisitr.com, 07 Aug 2016; Instagram profile, 09 Dec 2018)
Other information
SUSPENSION AND RETIREMENT
He announced his retirement from the sport in October 2019 after he received a 20-month suspension from the United States Anti-Doping Agency [USADA]. He tested positive for an anabolic agent in three out-of-competition tests in November and December 2018, and an arbitration panel found he had testosterone pellets inserted in his body as part of a medical treatment. "My doctor assured me that the United States Olympic Committee had approved the treatment. Regardless of the result of the arbitration ruling, I have decided to retire from swimming to pursue other professional interests." (bbc.com, 12 Oct 2019; afp.com, 12 Oct 2019)