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FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019

FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #1FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #2FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #3FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #4FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #5FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #6FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #7FINA Artistic Swimming World Series 2019 #8 FINA Artistic Swimming World Series - Super Final

The FINA Artistic Swimming World Series is an annual international series of Artistic Swimming meets organized (under the umbrella of FINA) by National Federations affiliated to FINA around the globe. This competitive circuit was created in order to raise the profile of the newly re-branded sport of artistic swimming around the world while creating more structured competition calendar for national teams.

 

FINA Swimming World Cup 2019

FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #1FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #2FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #3FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #4FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #5 - Berlin (GER)FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #6FINA Swimming World Cup 2019 #7

Launched in 1988, the FINA Swimming World Cup gathers world-class swimmers in a series of two-day meets organised between August and November each year. Across nine locations, the circuit is structured in clusters (Middle East, Europe and Asia) and distributes a total of prize money reaching US$ 2.5 million. 

FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019

FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #1FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #2FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #3FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #4FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #5FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #6FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #7FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #8FINA Diving Grand Prix 2019 #9

Each year, the FINA Diving Grand Prix invites divers from all parts of the world to compete during the February-November period in a circuit of nine four-day meets.

FINA intends to provide the international diving elite with a high-level competition that takes place in countries or locations that have a strong tradition in the sport, therefore enhancing their popularity.

The Grand Prix competition programme includes women's and men's 3m springboard, 10m platform, 3m springboard synchro and 10m platform synchro.

FINA General Congress

PR 56 – Serbia returns to Super Final throne

Team Serbia took its FINA Water Polo World League crown back in Belgrade, Serbia, on Sunday evening as the city was hosting the Super Final from June 18-23, the last stage of the tournament which ran from October 2018 until now.

Playing at home, the Serbians defeated their biggest Balkan opponents, Croatia, by one goal, settling for a final score of 12-11 in the gold match, despite losing the first and third quarters (1-3, 5-2, 1-3, 5-3).

Press Releases 2019
Belgrade, Serbia
Link
24Jun2019

The heavens opened first, then the Serbs went up

Water Polo World League Super Final Men 2019
Belgrade (SRB)
Final: Serbia v Croatia 12-11
Results & Teams

Game 24, 16.45 – Final: Serbia v Croatia 12-11

Quarters: 1-3, 5-2, 1-3, 5-3

Referees: Georgios Stavridis (GRE), Adrian Alexandrescu (ROU)

SERBIA

Branislav Mitrovic (9/20, 45.0%), Gojko Pijetlovic (GK, n. e.) – Dusan Mandic (4/5), Ognjen Stojanovic (0/1), Sava Randjelovic (0/1), Milos Cuk (1/3), Dusko Pijetlovic (0/2), Nemanja Vico (0/0), Milan Aleksic (0/2), Nikola Jaksic (1/1), Filip Filipovic (4/8), Andrija Prlainovic (1/6), Stefan Mitrovic (1/2). Coach: Dejan Savic

CROATIA

Marko Bijac (9/21, 42.8%), Ivan Marcelic (GK, n. e.) – Hrvoje Benic (0/1), Loren Fatovic (2/4), Luka Loncar (0/1), Maro Jokovic (1/4), Ivan Buljubasic (1/1), Ante Vukicevic (5/9), Andro Buslje (1/1), Lovre Milos (0/3), Josip Vrlic (1/3), Andelo Setka (0/0), Javier Garcia (0/1). Coach: Ivica Tucak

Shots:

SRB: 12/31, 38.7%

CRO: 11/28, 39.3%

Extramen:

SRB: 4 for 12

CRO: 6 for 12

Penalties:

SRB: 2 for 2

CRO: 3 for 3

MVP of the game:

Filip Filipovic (SRB)

Report

The clouds were gathering just as the crowd in the legendary Tasmajdan Pool but the 3,000 people fell into silence as the Croats netted two quick goals in 52 seconds in the middle of the first period. The Serbs could get on the score board only 18 seconds before the end of the opening quarter but Josip Vrlic managed to earn a penalty in the remaining moments and Maro Jokovic converted for 1-3. The other Croatian centre-forward Luka Loncar also forced a penalty right from the first possession in the second, Loren Fatovic sent the ball home and the world champs were 1-4 up already. What’s more, Marko Bijac delivered a save in the following man-down so nothing really predicted what came next.

The Croats froze in front as the Serbian defence tightened up while in front Dusan Mandic’s action goal was like the shot of a starting pistol, 55 seconds later Stefan Mitrovic netted a man-up for 3-4. The Serbs were back in the game, what’s more Filip Filipovic’s blast brought them to equal but the real roars came when the defence managed to kill a double man-down. And the Serbs were rolling like hell when they hit another two in 38 seconds, Andrija Prlainovic buried an extra, then Mandic’s rocket from action completed the Serbian rally. They were in a 5-0 rush but Ante Vukicevic managed to halt it at last, 40 seconds before the break he could put away a 6 on 5 for 6-5.

The second half started with three minutes of field battling with saves and blocked shots at both ends, then Vukicevic managed to gain some advantage and finished the counter for 6-6. Bijac denied Prlainovic in an extraman and after blocked shots the Croats earned a man-up which was converted by Loren Fatovic, the miserable run had already belonged to the past, they were in front again. Not for long, though, as the Serbs forced a penalty and Mandic buried it to halt his team’s scoreless phase at 6:42 minutes. 

The goalies were outstanding in the next attacks, Mitrovic posted three saves in a row, but Bijac also was up to the task, he had a crucial stop in a man-down, shortly after Andro Buslje gave back the lead to the Croats with a brilliant one-timer in equal strength.

So the last period started with Croatia leading – and the rain switching into downpour mood – and even if the Serbs could equalise through Jaksic’s fine ‘dunking’ from a 6 on 5, the Croats kept on going. Vrlic netted a man-up for 8-9, and after a killed man-down they even had a possession for +2 but Mitrovic caught Xavi Garcia’s ball.

With 4:36 to go, Dusan Mandic scored perhaps the most fantastic goal of the week, a backhander from 6m but Vukicevic, playing perhaps the match his life, found the back of the net from the next extra for 9-10. 

It was hard to decide whether the game’s or the rain’s intensity was higher. Bijac stopped Prlainovic’s shot once more in a man-up, Vukicevic missed his next action shot now, then came Filipovic with another outstanding blast and the pool was blown up once more, it stood 10-10 with 2:52 to go. The Croats missed a crucial 6 on 5 – could not even have a shot – while Filipovic was on fire even amidst this wet circumstances and launched another rocket to give back to the lead for the hosts again after the second period. Note, it was the Serbs’ 3rd action goal in a row and only 65 seconds remained from the game. Only 47 were left when the Croats got an extra, called a time-out and Vukicevic, who else?, could find the hole on the Serbian wall to make it even again at 11-11. The Serbs had 29 seconds and they rushed straight to the goal, and just 12 seconds later Mitrovic drove to the centre, Garcia pulled him back in front of the goal, it was a penalty even according to the old rules. Filipovic, as a true captain, didn’t hesitate to take the responsibility and the great warrior stroke again, he didn’t leave any chance to Bijac. What left for the Croats was a possession of 17 seconds, Bijac joined the attackers, just as in the bronze medal match the defenders let the goalkeeper try his luck but the Croatian couldn’t copy his Spanish colleague, and the stands erupted in euphoria soon. 

Quotes

Dejan Savic, coach, Serbia:

“It was a fantastic game, full of great turns, first the Croatians could take a three-goal lead, then we turned it back, they reacted well, but we also did great in the last period. What really gave us the edge that even if the rain came down, no fans left the stands, they stayed and cheered for us. Under these circumstances we had to win.”

Ivica Tucak, coach, Croatia:

“I’m proud of my team as we played really well even amidst these exceptional circumstances. We had a lapse after a great first period but we could come back. I can’t say any wrong to my players as they brought the best out of themselves. What makes mi a bit bitter that I really felt that today we had a chance to beat Serbia here in Belgrade which not happens to teams every day. But we go on, the World Championships are coming, another opportunity to prove our qualities.”

Filip Filipovic, MVP of the tournament, Serbia:

“This was truly a fantastic match, both teams played on a really high level. What makes a very special place for this win among all the others was the way our fans stood behind the team. They stayed, they roared, all 3,000 people – I can only say that I feel extreme happiness and pride that I am a Serbian citizen.”

Branislav Mitrovic, goalie, Serbia:

“You are right, we were below our level in the first months of the year, especially in Zagreb (where Serbia finished 6th at the Europa Cup). But this was somewhat intentional from Dejan’s (Savic) side as he wanted us to feel the hunger again, to find new motivation. It all happened in order to be on top here, in front of our fans where we could show once again that our team is the best.”

Bronze medal: Australia v Spain 11-10
Results & Teams

Game 23, 15.00 – Bronze medal match: Australia v Spain 11-10

Quarters: 3-1, 2-3, 4-4, 2-2

Referees: Boris Margeta (SLO), Vojin Putnikovic (SRB)

AUSTRALIA

Joel Dennerley (9/19, 47.4%), Anthony Hrysanthos (GK, n. e.) – Richard Campbell (1/6), George Ford (0/1), Joseph Kayes (4/5), Nathan Power (0/0), Edwards Lachlan (0/1), Aidan Roach (0/0), Aaron Younger (3/3), Lachlan Hollis (0/2), Rhys Howden (2/3), Blake Edwards (1/4). Coach: Elvis Fatovic

SPAIN

Eduardo Lorrio (5/14, 35.7%, Daniel Lopez, saves: 3/5, 60.0%, shots: 1/1) – Alberto Munarriz (2/5), Alvaro Granados (2/4), Miguel De Toro (0/1), Sergi Cabanas (0/1), Marc Larumbe (1/2), Guillem Garcia (0/2), Francisco Fernandez (0/2), Roger Tahull (1/2), Felipe Perrone (0/2), Blai Mallarach (3/4), Alejandro Bustos (0/1). Coach: David Martin

Shots:

AUS: 11/25, 44.0%

ESP: 10/27, 37.0%

Extramen:

AUS: 4 for 9

ESP: 4 for 11

Penalties:

None

MVP of the game:

Joseph Kayes (AUS)

Report

Little things can make big difference sometimes. We were early in the third period, Australia was leading 5-4 after a hard-fought first half which saw the boys from Down Under taking a flying start and a 3-1 lead and a Spanish comeback to 4-4 before Joseph Kayes managed to finish off a 6 on 5 from the 2m line.

The Aussies played their man-up but Eduardo Lorrio made a fine save on Blake Edward’s shot, the ball went to the side, just fell in front of the rope. The exclusion just expired and the incoming Spanish Miguel de Toro could have easily collected that rebound but he was under water when the save happened so he thought better leave the ball touching the rope. Though his coach and mates were all yelling... So instead of a Spanish possession and a possible goal for 5-5 an Aussie corner followed, and Edwards after a few passes Edwards blasted an action goal for 6-4. And the crime was followed by further punishment as 48 seconds later Aaron Younger put away a 6 on 5 for 7-4.

That ‘give-away corner’ long haunted the Spaniards as in this phase the Aussies managed to keep the distance. Blai Mallarach netted a man-up, but later Alvaro Granados was denied (which would have been 7-6) and Rhys Howden made it 8-5 from action. Mallarach’s left didn’t make any mistake in the next extra but Younger surprised Lorrio from 8m with a brilliant blast for 9-6.

However spectacular it was, Roger Tahull netted one from the centre and after a missed Aussie man-up Mallarach completed his hat-trick, this time on equal strength so the sides arrived to the last period with a single goal separating them (9-8).

Both teams worked hard for the next hit but it took almost four minutes before Spain made it at last, Alberto Munarriz’s action shot levelled the score at 9-9. Spain even had a possession to take the lead but it was gone without a shot, then Australia earned a man-up and after the time-out they could feed the ball to Kayes who usually scores from that position as only a handful of defenders could lock his enormous body and the young Alvaro Granados does not belong that circle... And just 49 seconds later it was a two-goal gap again, Richard Campbell’s shot got one if not two wicked deflection before landing behind incoming goalie Dani Lopez for 11-9 with 2:31 to go. Time was passing, the Aussies blocked Munarriz in man-down so Spain couldn’t get any closer. With 47 seconds remaining they launched a final assault, Lopez also joined the attack, the Aussies marked the field players offering a shot for the goalie and after some hesitation Dani took it and the ball hit the back of the net. It was a historical first from a goalie at the opponent’s half but not enough to save the match to a shootout as Aaron Younger swam with the ball all the way through in the remaining 24 seconds.

Quotes

Elvis Fatovic, coach, Australia:

“I feel really moved that my team could win this medal, a second one within a year at a FINA Event. The boys deserve all the credits, they fought with their hearts, they didn’t collapse mentally when Spain could equalise after a long battle, instead, they managed to score again and again. I am really proud of them.”

David Martin, coach, Spain

“This is the reality for Spain, whatever painful it is. The players are really tired but there no much time to recover, we have to work hard now to be ready for the World Championships.”

Aaron Younger, captain, Australia:

“We are happy, that’s a very good result for this team. Winning against Hungary, which didn’t bring its best team here, was just a good result but to beat this Spanish team is a big deal. Now I guess we need a little rest then we will focus on the World Championships.”

For places 5-6th: Hungary v Japan 15-13
Results & Teams

Game 22, 11.45 – For places 5-8th: Hungary v Japan 15-13

Quarters: 4-3, 4-2, 2-2, 5-6

Referees: Mikhail Dykman (CAN), Viktor Slanichenko (KAZ)

HUNGARY

David Bisztritsanyi (11/24, 45.8%) – Miklos Gor-Nagy (0/2), Mark Kallay (1/3), Tamas Gyarfas (0/2), Matyas Pasztor (1/1), Toni Nemet (3/6), David Jansik (0/0), Gergo Kovacs (1/2), Balazs Erdelyi (2/3), Bence Batori (3/7), Krisztian Bedo (3/5), Adam Nagy (1/1). Coach: Tamas Marcz

JAPAN

Katsuyuki Tanamura (6/21, 26.6%), Tomoyoshi Fukushima (GK, n. e.) – Kiyomu Date (0/0), Haruki Koppu (1/2), Mitsuaki Shiga (3/6), Takuma Yoshida (1/3), Shogo Kageta (0/2), Yusuke Shimzu (0/2), Mitsuru Takata (0/5), Atsushi Arai (1/2), Yusuke Inaba (3/9), Keigo Okawa (4/8), Kenta Araki (0/0). Coach: Yoji Omoto

Shots:

HUN: 15/32, 46.9%

JPN: 13/39, 33.3%

Extramen:

HUN: 4 for 6

JPN: 2 for 6

Penalties: 

HUN: 3 for 4

JPN: 2 for 4

MVP of the game:

Krisztian Bedo (HUN)

Report

Hungary learnt the lessons from last year and its players had already seen it was worth waiting patiently before their physical power started dominating in the game against Japan played in the prelims. It happened again and the decisive phase came a bit earlier than three days ago: this time the Magyars netted three in a row to jump to a 7-4 lead and they kept the gap till halftime.

In the third they netted one more for 9-5 but then came a lapse in their concentration, they wasted some fine chances with ease while the Japanese never stopped believing and came back to 9-7, what’s more, they had a 6 on 5 to go back to one goal but the Hungarian defence worked well and Matyas Pasztor netted a calming penalty for 10-7 45 seconds before the last break.

Then in the fourth Krisztian Bedo decided the match in the first minute as he delivered a penalty – Mark Kallay converted it –, then netted a fine goal from the centre and at 12-7 it was felt that there would be no way back for the Japanese. To ensure this, two more goals came in a span of 21 seconds, again a shot from the centre, this time Toni Nemet’s muscle mass was too big to deal with, and Balazs Erdelyi buried a 6 on 5 soon for 14-7. 

This latter one was validated a bit later only, beforehand the Japanese also scored when the deck video-reviewer referee Daniel Flahive alerted his colleagues on the head-set that it might be worth checking the ball’s position after Erdelyi’s shot and after the review showed a clear evidence Canadian ref Mikhail Dyckman decided to call the Hungarian goal and annulling the ensuing Japanese hit.

The Hungarians thought they did enough, indeed they had done, since they won the match at that point, still the Japanese didn’t let it go and netted as many as six goals in the closing 4:50 minutes, though there was no real chance for any more than narrowing the gap since their last one came 13 seconds from time.

As a nice gesture, Hungary called a time-out and tried to set up a 7 on 6 attack in their last possession with Miklos Gor-Nagy taking the shot at the end but the Japanese defenders blocked his attempt so not a goal marked the end of his illustrious career. Still, Hungary’s world champion player had a fine season to look back on with plenty of club success including the Champions League crown before he announced that today was his last one in competitive water polo.

Quotes

Tamas Marcz, coach, Hungary:

“We played according to our game plan which included practicing a couple of defensive schemes and that worked well. Our concentration level dropped in the fourth period once we achieved a multiple-lead, credits go to Japan that they didn’t give in and wanted to decrease the gap which they finally managed to do. Perhaps that shouldn’t have happened but at the end of the day, we won, finished fifth, for this team this is the reality. Beforehand I thought we could make the semis, I wished to see these players battling against Croatia or Serbia, we just missed that chance by a fingernail so I’m not really disappointed what I saw from the team. We see where is room for improvement, we have to work hard on that and the picture got much clearer for me as whom I might pick for the World Championship team from this line-up.”

Yoji Omoto, coach, Japan:

“It’s not easy for the teams to play six games in six days, by this time everyone’s level starts going down, it would be better to include rest days. As for today’s game, we proved again that we could score goals, even 5-6 within a period which is good. However, if we want to achieve good results, we have to improve our defence and then 3-4 goals per period might be also enough. This game also showed that, our defence crashed in the second period and early in the third. So we can say, that our attack is already on a good level but we have to work on our defence more. Also, it’s good to see that we could play good games with the European teams and they no longer underestimate us.” 

For places 7-8th: Canada v Kazakhstan 16-17 (pen)
Results & Teams

Game 21, 10.00 – For places 7-8th: Canada v Kazakhstan 16-17

Quarters: 4-2, 3-3, 4-5, 2-3 – pen: 3-4

Referees: Gyorgy Kun (HUN), Jaume Teixido (ESP)

CANADA

Dusan Aleksic (10/23, 43.4% – pen: 1/5), Milan Radenovic (GK, n. e.) – Gaelan Patterson (1/2), Bogdan Djerkovic (0/0), Nicolas Constantin-Bicari (6/10), Matthew Halajian (1/4), Geogios Torakis (0/3), Mark Spooner (0/0), Jeremie Cote (2/5), Aleksa Gardijan (1/2), Arie Soleimanipak (1/3), Jeremie Blanchard (0/0), Reuel D’Souza (4/5). Coach: Pino Porzio

KAZAKHSTAN

Madikhan Makhmetov (0/4, 0%), Valeriy Shlemov (9/18, 50.0% – pen: 1/3) – Yevgeniy Medvedev (2/7), Maxim Zhardan (5/9), Roman Pilipenko (1/3), Miras Aubakirov (1/3), Alexey Shmider (0/2), Murat Shakenov (3/4), Altay Altayev (1/1), Stanislav Shvedov (3/4), Ravil Manafov (0/1), Yulian Verdesh (0/0). Coach: Dejan Stanojevic

Shots:

CAN: 13/29, 44.8%

KAZ: 13/31, 41.9%

Extramen:

CAN: 6 for 15

KAZ: 8 for 15

Penalties:

CAN: 1 for 2

KAZ: none

MVP of the game:

Murat Shakirov (KAZ)

Report

When Canada scored three connecting goals late in the first period to gain a 4-2 lead, the game took a well-defined path. The North Americans went ahead by two, the Kazakhs chased them and equalised. It happened three times: in the second after 5-3, though after 5-5 the Canadians added two to lead 7-5 at halftime.

However, the two extraman goals brought the Asians even early in the third but it was Canada’s turn again for 9-7. Then at 10-8 it could have been even three but Valery Shlemov caught a penalty and Yevgeniy Medvedev scored immediately from the next possession for 10-9. Reuel D’Souza converted the next penalty for Canada for 11-9 but the Kazakhs could pull one back four seconds before the last break and they levelled the score right in the 31st second in the fourth for 11-11.

Though the Canadians lost their best shooter D’Souza with three fouls before that 6 on 5, still they had Nicholas Constantin-Bicari who netted two man-ups and with 2:46 to go Canada had the two-goal lead. But it didn’t last till the end, what’s more, the Kazakhs equalised again, this time in 46 seconds and there were still 1:26 minutes to play. Both team got the chance to win the match but Canada missed its 6 on 5, just as the Kazakhs at the end, so a shootout decided the match.

The Canadians missed first, that was followed by one save at both ends so the Kazakhs were in advantage. In the fifth round their goalie, Valeriy Shmelov constantly moved forward despite the refs’ warnings and the Spanish referee Jaume Texeido thought he saw enough and sent him out. In that situation only one of the nominated shooting players could take over the goalie’s post, so Stanislav Shvedov swam in but couldn’t have a hand on the next shot. However, Miras Aubakirov ended the excitements as he sent the ball home and earned $5,000 more to Kazakhstan as this win placed them 7th in the tournament.

Quotes

Pino Porzio, head coach, Canada:

“We had the chance to have a bigger lead, missed a penalty to go plus three but it’s really hard for this young team to play on a consistent level especially on the sixth day. Also, it’s a bit unusual for these players to approach a game in a tournament like this that they considered a kind of favourite. Today we made too many mistakes in defence, scoring 13 goals it’s fine but conceding 13 means that our defence didn’t work well. Anyway, it was a great experience, they could learn a lot here.”

Dejan Stanojevic, coach, Kazakhstan:

“We talked about our real position in this tournament, now we are happy to take the seventh place. What was really positive in this match – and it had been in the previous one against Japan – that the team didn’t give in when they were two-three goals down, they went on, fought and today it brought its result. My job is to fix the current level and then start developing the team step by step.”

Serbia returned to the throne after winning an incredible final against arch-rival Croatia at the FINA Men’s Water Polo World League Super Final in Belgrade. The match itself produced an outstanding battle which could have gone either way but Filip Filipovic’s penalty 17 seconds from time secured the home side’s triumph as well as a spot at the 2020 Olympics.

Link
23Jun2019

Devastating starts in the semis set up another showdown for Serbia and Croatia

Water Polo World League Super Final Men 2019
Belgrade (SRB)
For places 5-8: Hungary v Canada 15-8
Results & Teams

Game 17, 10.00 – For places 5-8th: Hungary v Canada 15-8

Quarters: 4-3, 4-3, 3-1, 4-1

Referees: Daniel Flahive (AUS), Jaume Teixido (ESP)

HUNGARY

David Bisztritsanyi (12/20, 60.0%) – Miklos Gor-Nagy (1/1), Mark Kallay (3/5), Tamas Gyarfas (0/1), Matyas Pasztor (1/5), Toni Nemet (1/1), David Jansik (1/4), Gergo Kovacs (3/3), Balazs Erdelyi (2/4), Bence Batori (3/5), Krisztian Bedo (0/1), Adam Nagy (0/1). Coach: Tamas Marcz

CANADA

Dusan Aleksic (8/23, 34.8%), Milan Radenovic (GK, n. e.) – Gaelan Patterson (0/3), Bogdan Djerkovic (0/1), Nicolas Constantin-Bicari (1/4), Matthew Halajian (2/5), Geogios Torakis (0/1), Mark Spooner (0/1), Jeremie Cote (0/2), Aleksa Gardijan (2/2), Arie Soleimanipak (0/2), Jeremie Blanchard (0/1), Reuel D’Souza (3/8). Coach: Pino Porzio

Shots:

HUN: 15/31, 48.4%

CAN: 8/30, 26.7%

Extramen:

HUN: 8 for 12

CAN: 1 for 9

Penalties:

HUN: 1 for 1

CAN: 2 for 2

MVP of the game:

Mark Kallay (HUN)

Report

On Day 1 Canada caused the biggest upset of the tournament so far by beating the Magyars – and that also contributed to Hungary’s failure to reach the semis (it’s not all the same to meet Australia or Kazakhstan in the quarters).

However, Canadian head coach Pino Porzio already said on Friday evening that this crossover game would be no way similar to the previous encounter. Especially because the Canadians finished their QF against the Serbs around 22.00, and had to come back to play with the Hungarians at 10.00 on Saturday. That would be a demanding schedule even for the strongest teams but the North Americans found it really hard to cope with – while playing the 5th game on the 5th day is also something they barely do in the rest of the season.

The partial results of the quarters show clearly how they were running out of gas as time passed. The first half they could hold on for 8-6. Then they lost the second half 7-2.

The Magyars learnt the lesson from the first day when they fell behind 1-5 and couldn’t climb back in time to turn that contest. They began with a hard pressing game even at the cost of a couple of penalties as Nicolas Constantin Bicari (arriving to Hungary for the next season to play for Champions League winning side Ferencvaros) could beat his defender one-on-one. Still, they were leading all the way in the first half, though only one-two goals at this stage.

Then in the third they switched to zone defence, the tiring Canadians couldn’t shoot as precisely and Hungary’s reserve goalie David Bisztritsanyi was also up to the task. He had to step in after first choice goalie Gergely Kardos was banned for brutality after a video review but Bisztritsanyi produced a brilliant 60% saving percentage, firm backing for his team which opened the third with a double in 47 seconds to expand the gap to four goals (10-6) and there was no way back for the Canadians.

Though the game was decided, it’s still offered one more historical act: Hungary called a time out 37 seconds from time and set up a 7 on 6 attack in its last possession (according to the new rules, the goalkeeper can join the offence – beforehand it was forbidden to cross the halfway line). The Serbs also tried that against Kazakhstan but couldn’t score, now the Magyars had an attempts and Bence Batori scored the first-ever 7 on 6 goal at a major FINA event.

Quotes

Tamas Marcz, coach, Hungary:

“The players delivered the plan quite precisely. We wanted to start with a heavy pressing to tire a bit the Canadians, then switch to the zone defence in the second half and it worked, as the progress of the match mirrors it. We wanted to prove that Day 1 was just a one-off derailing, not more and I think we showed our quality today.”

Pino Porzio, coach, Canada:

“Playing five games in five days is something these players haven’t used to but that’s why we need these big tournaments. They have to go through this, see how they could play against these big teams under these circumstances. Of course, it was tough to come back in less then 12 hours and play again, but this is water polo. Hungary has a better quality anyway, so it was great to win against them on the first day but we knew that this match would be absolutely different.”

Mark Kallay, player, Hungary:

“At least we proved for the fans and above all for ourselves that whatever happened on the first day, we are the better side, without question. We still feel sorry for not making the semis, but we have to go on and clinch the fifth place at least.”

For places 5-8: Japan v Kazakhstan 13-12
Results & Teams

Game 18, 11.45 – For places 5-8th: Japan v Kazakhstan 13-12

Quarters: 4-2, 4-2, 2-3, 3-5

Referees: Nenad Peris (CRO), Vojin Putnikovic (SRB)

JAPAN

Katsuyuki Tanamura (9/20, 45.0%), Tomoyoshi Fukushima (GK, n. e.) – Kiyomu Date (0/1), Haruki Koppu (0/1), Mitsuaki Shiga (0/2), Takuma Yoshida (2/3), Shogo Kageta (0/0), Yusuke Shimzu (0/3), Mitsuru Takata (0/1), Atsushi Arai (4/7), Yusuke Inaba (5/10), Keigo Okawa (1/3), Kenta Araki (1/1). Coach: Yoji Omoto

KAZAKHSTAN

Madikhan Makhmetov (4/9, 44.4%), Valeriy Shlemov (3/10, 30.0%) – Yevgeniy Medvedev (1/3), Maxim Zhardan (1/2), Roman Pilipenko (0/1), Miras Aubakirov (3/4), Alexey Shmider (0/0), Murat Shakenov (4/5), Yegor Berbelyuk (0/1), Stanislav Shvedov (0/1), Ravil Manafov (0/1), Altay Altayev (0/2). Coach: Dejan Stanojevic

Shots:

JPN: 13/32, 40.6%

KAZ: 12/23, 52.2%

Extramen:

JPN: 6 for 13

KAZ: 3 for 9

Penalties:

JPN: 1 for 1

KAZ: 3 for 3

MVP of the game:

Atsushi Arai (JPN)

Report

The first half went as expected, Japan built a massive lead as expected, Atsushi Arai’s 7m backhanded goal was a sheer beauty to watch, perhaps it was the goal of the tourney. Nothing really promised that the game’s progress would take any sharper turn, then, at 8-5 an ill-timed timeout gave a twist to the match. It didn’t seem a good idea to call for it as the Kazakh goalkeeper was excluded but the Japanese coach did it, offering the opponent a free opportunity to bring in the reserve goalie. Who, as it happens usually, made the save in the man-down, then added some more while his team came back to 8-7. What’s more, Ravil Manafov’s shot from the centre passed the goalie but he could catch the ball just before it crossed the line. And the equaliser never came then, instead Yusuke Inaba netted two in 35 seconds to reset the 3-goal lead shortly before the last break.

Yusuke went on in the fourth, converted a penalty from the first possession for 11-7 and the game seemed to return its expected path, especially when the gap grew to five goals at 13-8 with 4:30 to go. However, the Kazakhs weren’t done they launched a last surge while the Japanese tried something which was not really their game: to kill the time. It led to a series of Kazakh goals in succession, with 2:04 to go it was 13-11 but they couldn’t add the next one in time. When Mikhail Ruday scored from the centre only 29 seconds were remaining and the Japanese kept the ball to win the Asian derby.

Quotes

Yoji Omoto, coach, Japan:

“In the last three years we lost only once to Kazakhstan, at the Asian Championships, otherwise we beat them in every game, so we knew we were the better team. We could have decided the match earlier but we missed some shots and this let them back to the game. The Kazakhs tried to slow down the game, that’s their approach, and sometimes it worked in this game as well. For us this win was important as it underlined that we are the number one team in Asia.”

Dejan Stanojevic, coach, Serbia:

“For us these games offer the chance to play a tight match with a chance, not the games like the ones against Serbia or Croatia, even Australia is above our level. What makes me satisfied that we are growing, improving step by step. We are constructing this team through tournaments like this. Also, because of the Asian events, we perhaps know Japan better, the players know what are the best tools to play an even match with them. We had some chances today, what made the difference was the man-down. We should have not let them shoot from the left side, positions 1 and 2 but we couldn’t apply that really successfully and conceded goals from those positions.”

Semi-final: Australia v Serbia 11-16
Results & Teams

Game 19, 15.00 – Semi-final: Canada v Serbia 11-16

Quarters: 2-6, 2-3, 3-2, 4-5

Referees: Adrian Alexandrescu (ROU), Arkadiy Voevodin (RUS)

AUSTRALIA

Anthony Hrysanthos (1/7, 14.3%), Joel Dennerley (4/14, 28.6%) – Richard Campbell (2/4), George Ford (0/1), Joseph Kayes (3/7), Nathan Power (0/0), Edwards Lachlan (0/0), Aidan Roach (1/5), Aaron Younger (2/4), Andrew Ford (1/2), Timothy Putt (1/1), Rhys Howden (0/2), Blake Edwards (1/4). Coach: Elvis Fatovic

SERBIA

Branislav Mitrovic (8/15, 53.3%), Gojko Pijetlovic (2/6, 33.3%) – Dusan Mandic (1/3), Strahinja Rasovic (1/2), Sava Randjelovic (0/2), Milos Cuk (0/0), Dusko Pijetlovic (2/3), Nemanja Vico (2/2), Milan Aleksic (0/1), Nikola Jaksic (1/2), Filip Filipovic (5/8), Andrija Prlainovic (3/3), Stefan Mitrovic (1/3). Coach: Dejan Savic

Shots:

AUS: 11/30, 36.7%

SRB: 16/29, 55.2%

Extramen:

AUS: 7 for 10

SRB: 6 for 9

Penalties:

AUS: 1 for 1

SRB: 1 for 1

MVP of the game:

Filip Filipovic (SRB)

Report

Though the T-storms eluded Belgrade in the past two days, an S-Storm hit the Aussie half in the opening period of the first semi-final. The Serbian lightning struck six times in eight minutes, the first three came down in 83 seconds from three consecutive possessions. Filip Filipovic’s gun opened the shooting, followed by fellow leftie Dusan Mandic and Nemanja Vico also netted one from the centre. The Aussies could get on the score-board at 0-4 but two more extraman goals arrived to give Serbia a 1-6 lead still in the first period. 

Though the Aussies came back from 1-5 down to beat Hungary a day earlier, here a similar resurrection against the Olympic champions would have required a miracle. The Australians tried to create one though, netted a double to came back to 4-7 deep into the second, but the Serbs responded painfully, again with two from 6 on 5s to go 4-9 by halftime.

Soon the hosts went 6-11 up and even a miracle seemed to be unsubstantial to recover from here for the Sharks. Still, they tried hard and managed to put away two man-ups, kill one in between to trail 7-11 before the last period.

Richard Campbell hit one from a man-up to open the fourth but Dusko Pijetlovic was on target from their next 6 on 5 and something similar came when Roach’s penalty was immediately followed by Filipovic’s blast for 9-13.

The Serbs were a bit off-pace in the following minutes while the Aussies managed to set up Joseph Kayes in front of the goal in back-to-back man-ups and his muscle-mass prevailed in both occasions to heat up the battle at 11-13 with 3:22 to go. 

Before the hosts got intro trouble, the Filipovic Rocket Plant delivered another award-winning product and that was the perfect cooler in the afternoon heat. The Serbs destroyed the next Aussie man-up, Nikola Jaksic’s distant shot sneaked in with 1:35 remaining so it was over. At the end Strahinja Rasovic hit one more in the last second to settle the match where it had stood at 1-6, just after the addition of 10 goals apiece.

Also, the game offered a new biological discovery: this time the Dolphins (as the Serbs nickname their side) proved to be stronger than the Sharks.

Quotes

Elvis Fatovic, coach, Australia:

“There was nothing unexpected apart from the fact the we saw a totally different approach towards applying the new rules as in the previous four days. This was surprising, but it doesn’t change the other fact that Serbia is a much better team and they deserved this win. We try our best to get the bronze medal tomorrow.”

Dejan Savic, coach, Serbia:

“In the first half we played really well as we planned. Then in the second half we started to do different things, commit mistakes in a row. If we play like in the first half we can win tomorrow. If we play like in the second half, we will lose.”

Aaron Younger, captain, Australia:

“We tried our best but Serbia is a better team. We couldn’t hold them at the beginning and after that it was too hard to chase them.”

Milan Aleksic, player, Serbia:

“In the first half our game was fine, but in the third period our level dropped, especially the communication among us didn’t work properly, though it happens when a team leads by several goals. But we could rebuild everything by the end, so there is one more step to go.”

Semi-final: Croatia v Spain 10-8
Results & Teams

Game 20, 16.45 – Semi-final: Croatia v Spain 10-8

Quarters: 5-1, 3-2, 2-4, 0-1

Referees: Boris Margeta (SLO), Georgios Stavridis (GRE)

CROATIA

Marko Bijac (16/24, 66.7%), Ivan Marcelic (GK, n. e.) – Hrvoje Benic (1/2), Loren Fatovic (1/2), Luka Loncar (1/1), Maro Jokovic (1/5), Ivan Buljubasic (1/4), Ante Vukicevic (0/1), Andro Buslje (0/0), Lovre Milos (0/0), Josip Vrlic (2/4), Andelo Setka (1/1), Javier Garcia (2/6). Coach: Ivica Tucak

SPAIN

Daniel Lopez (6/16, 37.5%), Eduardo Lorrio (GK, n. e.) – Alberto Munarriz (3/6), Alvaro Granados (1/4), Miguel De Toro (0/2), Sergi Cabanas (0/1), Marc Larumbe (1/3), Alberto Barroso (1/1), Francisco Fernandez (0/3), Roger Tahull (0/1), Felipe Perrone (1/5), Blai Mallarach (1/6), Alejandro Bustos (0/0). Coach: David Martin

Shots:

CRO: 10/26, 38.5%

ESP: 8/32, 25.0%

Extramen:

CRO: 5 for 9

ESP: 4 for 11

Penalties:

CRO: none

ESP: 1 for 1

MVP of the game:

Marko Bijac (CRO)

Report

Croatia just copied their Serbian fellows in the second semi-final as they stormed to a 5-1 lead against the bewildered Spaniards. It was an unusual scene to see the world champions dominating so overwhelmingly over the European silver medallists. Three goals from action, two from man-ups, while Marko Bijac delivered some fine saves to put the game on a nice track from the Croatians’ view.

They could have gone even further but missed their first extra, while the Spaniards started to show some signs of life with two extraman goals, but the Croats kept their high level in offence, and closed the quarter two more goals from the left side to go 8-3 up by halftime.

However, one can never think the Spanish would let it go, what they needed was exactly the way they managed to start the third period: a man-up goal by Alvaro Granados and nice hit from action from Alberto Munarriz just 45 seconds later. With 8-5 flashing on the scoreboard, the excitements were back and even though Ivan Buljubasic netted a man-up for 9-5, the Spaniards went on pushing and Blai Mallarach’s left-handed blast found the back of the net.

Though it seemed crucial when they missed a 6 on 4, especially in the wake of Hrvoje Benic’s action goal which reset the four-goal gap. But Alberto Munarriz netted a tricky free throw for 10-7 and the Spaniards soon had a man-up to come back to two but they couldn’t make it after a time-out. Dani Lopez backed them with another fine save in a man-down but three goals still separated the sides before the last break.

With 5:30 to go it finally got down to two after a fine counter – Lopez’s 26m long pass would even make an NFL quarterback proud – and Munarriz finished the action for 10-8.

Maro Jokovic’s shot just bounced around the goal-line, the referees opted for an immediate review but the technology favoured the Spaniards. They had three possession to halve the distance but couldn’t create any danger while the Croats played with the time to keep the gap as game arrived to the last minute, where two saves from Bijac froze the match (indeed there was a spectacular difference between the goalies: Bijac came up with 16 saves and produced a 66.7% saving percentage, while Dani Lopez had only 6 saves and finished with 37.5% – way too decisive in today's water polo). Thus the last 5:30 minutes didn’t see any goal which was too good for the Croats who will have another showdown with Serbia for the title – and a place at the Olympics.

Quotes

Ivica Tucak, coach, Croatia:

“We started the game perfectly, we were on top both mentally and physically, did everything as planned and later on still managed to stick to the game plan. We tried to be prepared for the Spanish team’s tactics and I think we reacted well. In the second half we also have some ‘black-holes’ in our game, something similar what the Serbs had against Australia. But this is normal in a tournament like this when you have to play in a daily basis.”

David Martin, coach, Spain:

“I don’t understand what happened to my team in the first period. This was not our game, this was not the way you have to start a semi-final. After that we showed something more worthy to the Spanish team but Croatia is an excellent team and it’s almost impossible to get them on level once they had such a big advantage.”

Marko Bijac, goalie, Croatia:

“We played excellently in the first period and in the first half, got a big advantage and after that we could play with patience and discipline. I think we fully deserved this win.”

Dani Lopez, goalie, Spain:

“When you start a game against Croatia like we did, then there is no way back. To beat teams like them or like the Serbs, we need to lead, or hold a tie but chasing 

Serbia was the first team to reach the gold medal match here at the FINA Men’s Water Polo World League Super Final in Belgrade. The hosts staged a devastating opening period and after going 6-1 up they never really let the Aussies come back in the game though in the fourth the boys from Down Under closed up the gap to two but never got closer. The Croats then copied their neighbours, opened their semi against Spain with a 5-1 rush, held on for 8-3 till half-time and kept two goals till the end with a tactical play.

Link
22Jun2019

Australia ousts Hungary in shootout, meets Serbia in the semis, Croatia, Spain also through

Water Polo World League Super Final Men 2019
Belgrade (SRB)
Quarter-final: Hungary v Australia 15-16 (pen)
Results & Teams

Game 13, 15.00 – Quarter-final: Hungary v Australia 15-16

Quarters: 2-1, 3-0, 2-4, 3-5 – pen: 5-6

Referees: Boris Margeta (SLO), Nenad Peris (CRO)

HUNGARY

Istvan Kardos (4/14, 28.5%, pen: 1/6), David Bisztritsanyi (pen: 0/1) – Miklos Gor-Nagy (1/3), Mark Kallay (1/4), Kristof Varnai (0/2), Matyas Pasztor (2/7), Toni Nemet (0/0), David Jansik (2/2), Gergo Kovacs (0/2), Balazs Erdelyi (2/3), Bence Batori (4/6), Krisztian Bedo (0/1), Adam Nagy (3/3). Coach: Tamas Marcz

AUSTRALIA

Joel Dennerley (2/7, 28.5%, pen: 1/4, Anthony Hrysanthos (4/9, 44.4%, pen: 0/3) – Richard Campbell (5/9), George Ford (0/0), Joseph Kayes (3/7), Nathan Power (0/2), Edwards Lachlan (0/1), Aidan Roach (2/2), Aaron Younger (0/5), Andrew Ford (2/2), Timothy Putt (1/1), Rhys Howden (2/3), Blake Edwards (1/2). Coach: Elvis Fatovic

Shots:

HUN: 10/26, 38.4%

AUS: 10/27, 37.0%

Extramen:

HUN: 5 for 11

AUS: 7 for 18

Penalties:

HUN: 1 for 1

AUS: none

Report

The first half was surprisingly one-sided as the Hungarian defence worked properly while the Aussie shooters simply couldn’t find their target. After taking the lead, they were simply unable to let a precise shoot go while the Magyars built a massive lead by half-time. It was 5-1 and the most telling stat was the Hungarian goalie’s saving percentage: 1 catch on 2 shots. The Magyars didn’t even need an outstanding performance from Istvan Kardos as the Aussie balls were either blocked or flew all over the place but towards the goal.

Though Hungary was in full control, the first signs that their focus also starts dropping became visible in the last possession of the first half and in the first in the second: both ended up in a man-up and both were wasted with unusual ease. And with these line-up of the Australians, no one could think that the terrible run in offence would stay on the rock-bottom level – in fact when they finally managed to score after 14:30 minutes – and surviving those man-downs which would have pushed them back to 1-6 –, they began to believe again.

Soon came another one for 5-3 but a man-up miss and then a converted penalty from the Hungarians halted their resurrection at 6-3. Though only temporarily as the Magyars’ level in attack fell again, they could not set up real chances, blow one more man-up while at the other end the Aussies could put away two man-ups for 6-5. Still, Bence Batori’s action goal 25 seconds from time served as psychological boost for Hungary before the last period.

That’s gone quickly as Aidan Roach netted a 6 on 5 right from the first possession in the fourth and then had some attacks to go even but they didn’t succeed and with 5:25 to go Adam Nagy’s sneaking shot found the back of the net to reset the two-goal cushion.

But it didn’t last long as the Aussies netted two action goals in 46 seconds, Richard Campbell and Roach were both on target, and more agonisingly for the Magyars between the two they missed a man-up even though they set up Miklos Gor-Nagy on the 2m line but he pulled the ball to the bar. Instead of +2 it was even at 8-8, soon Hungary lost its centre-forward Krisztian Bedo with three fouls, and soon the Aussies were in front with another Campbell blast from a man-up. The equaliser came quickly, though, David Jansik netted a 6 on 4 with 2:38 remaining. 

The finish brought enormous battle, the Hungarians managed to kill back-to-back Aussie 6 on 5s but couldn’t escape a third one and Joseph Kayes’s shot found the back of the net (it was the third goal in a row when the ball bounced in from the goalie’s hand). It happened 37 seconds before the end so the Hungarians was under pressure but they stayed calm, earned a man-up and with 2 seconds to go Matyas Pasztor’s bouncing shot hit the top right corner to set up a penalty shootout.

Interestingly enough, it was Pasztor who made a crucial miss in the third round, just seconds after the Hungarian spirits had been lifted as Kardos had caught Aaron Younger’s attempt. Both coaches tried to exchange the goalies, Anthony Hrysantos made a great entry in the second half by delivering some morale-boosting saves in the third period but after two rounds Elvis Fatovis sent Joel Dennerley back and that might have disturbed Pasztor who hit the bar.

After five rounds it stood 4-4, in the first round of the sudden death the second goalie for Hungary David Bisztritsanyi couldn’t have a hand on Campbell’s next shot, Nagy made his one, then Kayes converted against returning goalie Kardos. Batori tried the right side of Dennerley but the Aussie goalie guessed it right, pushed the ball to the post and that ended the contest and sent the Aussies in the semi-final.

The Hungarians perhaps could recall some crucial moments in this game but also their shocking loss to Canada on the opening day and that goal-no-goal? shot in the dying seconds of their game against Spain – these pushed them to the second position instead of finishing atop and play an easy quarter-final against Kazakhstan.

However, by not fielding their best team here – from this team one or two players might make the World Championships team – they somewhat put the writing on the wall by their own hands.

Quotes

Tamas Marcz, coach, Hungary:

“We could barely stand the pressure of facing almost twice as much man-downs as the Australians which I didn’t consider rightful provided there was no real difference in the defensive approach between the two sides. At least that was my impression, while I also have to admit that we missed a couple of chances in the middle of the match where we could have kept more goals from our lead built in the first half. Anyway, I’m still proud of my team as they kept fighting till the end and luck was not on our side this time.”

Elvis Fatovic, coach, Australia

“The first half was a disaster, most probably the worst I’ve ever seen from my team. In the break I told them not to worry about the chances, they just had to take their shots as in the first half all shots and passes were like alibis. Of course, we were also aware that the Hungarians had a rather tiring match against Japan as that game usually dries you out, so we were counting on that they couldn’t cope with our pace that’s why we pushed as hard as we could in the final period. Even if we could make in the shootout, but our plan worked after all.”

Aaron Younger, captain, Australia:

“It was a good game even if the first half was way too bad. But we need these matches to gain more experience, to feel what it needs to make a come back, to make the right decisions in crucial moments. And now we face another ‘easy task’, a semi-final against Serbia.”

Quarter-final: Japan v Croatia 13-20
Results & Teams

Game 14, 16.45 – Quarter-final: Japan v Croatia 13-20

Quarters: 3-4, 3-6, 2-5, 5-5

Referees: Georgios Stavridis (GRE), Vojin Putnikovic (SRB)

JAPAN

Katsuyuki Tanamura (9/29, 31.0%), Tomoyoshi Fukushima (GK, n. e.) – Kiyomu Date (0/0), Haruki Koppu (0/0), Mitsuaki Shiga (1/1), Takuma Yoshida (1/2), Shogo Kageta (0/0), Yusuke Shimzu (1/2), Mitsuru Takata (1/1), Atsushi Arai (2/4), Yusuke Inaba (5/10), Keigo Okawa (1/6), Kenta Araki (1/1). Coach: Yoji Omoto

CROATIA

Marko Bijac, Ivan Marcelic (GK) – Andrija Basic (0/0), Loren Fatovic (5/7), Luka Loncar (1/2), Maro Jokovic (2/5), Ivan Buljubasic (2/2), Ante Vukicevic (1/3), Andro Buslje (2/3), Lovre Milos (1/4), Ivan Krapic (3/5), Andelo Setka (3/4), Javier Garcia (0/0). Coach: Ivica Tucak

Shots:

JPN: 13/27, 48.1%

CRO: 20/35, 57.1%

Extramen:

JPN: 5 for 13

CRO: 8 for 10

Penalties:

JPN: 1 for 1

CRO: 2 for 2

MVP of the game:

Loren Fatovic (CRO)

Report

Preparing against Japan is never easy as they play a unique style of water polo which caused a couple of upsets in the past – most notably one year ago in this stage they ousted the US team in the World League Super Final arriving to the quarters from the 4th place in their group.

Against the European big boys there is usually one question: how long they can keep the result in balance. If they could stay close or even hold on for a lead long enough that might cause some tensions in the rivals’ camp which would lead further mistakes and more frustration seeing the Japanese striking from the counters.

It happened a coupe of times – but not today.

The only turbulence in the Croatian power occurred early in the first period when the Japanese netted three in 2:33 minutes for 3-2 after being 0-2 down but the world champions overcame this minor incident quickly – in 29 seconds they regained the lead.

Loren Fatovic netted a double early in the second to extend the gap to three at 4-7 and even though the two top guns of the Asians, Atsuhi Arai and Yosuke Inaba managed to score a couple of times, the Croats simply outpowered and outplayed the Japan defence and went 6-10 up until halftime.

Fatovic also opened the third with a fine goal and even though their opponents pulled two back, three more Croatian goals in a span of 91 seconds sank their last hopes and they added one more shortly before the break (8-15).

The last period was more like a showdown from the wild west, shooting without loading, it was an entertaining eight minutes with 5 goals apiece, and the Croats tied their own scoring record from Day 1 with 20 goals.

Quotes

Ivica Tucak, coach, Croatia:

“We were a bit afraid before the match of what we could expect from Japan which plays atypical water polo compared to the other teams. But with the exception of 3-4 minutes in the first period we managed to control the match, we were really composed both in front and in defence, stopped their counters so we played as we needed to win easily.”

Yoji Omoto, coach, Japan:

“We tried to do a special defence around the centre-forward but also keep our main weapon, to prepare to launch counter-attacks from the defence. But the Croatians are really strong players and they were unexpectedly fast today. We expected them building their attacks slower but they did a lot of moves and those forced defensive errors on our side. We try to improve every year, step by step, watch a lot videos, try to point put what kind of mistakes we committed and try to learn from them. But it’s really hard to play against the European teams though we wish to beat them in the future.”

Quarter-final: Spain v Kazakhstan 19-10
Results & Teams

Game 15, 19.15 – Quarter-final: Spain v Kazakhstan 19-10

Quarters: 4-1, 4-2, 6-4, 5-3

Referees: Arkadiy Voevodin (RUS), Daniel Flahive (AUS)

SPAIN

Daniel Lopez (3/5, 60.0%), Eduardo Lorrio (4/12, 33.3%) – Alberto Munarriz (3/4), Alvaro Granados (5/6), Miguel De Toro (2/3), Sergi Cabanas (0/0), Marc Larumbe (2/3), Alberto Barroso (4/6), Francisco Fernandez (0/0), Bernat Sanahuja (2/3), Guillem Garcia (0/1), Blai Mallarach (1/2), Alejandro Bustos (0/0). Coach: David Martin

KAZAKHSTAN

Madikhan Makhmetov (2/6, 33.3%), Valeriy Shlemov (4/19, 21.1%) – Yevgeniy Medvedev (1/5), Maxim Zhardan (2/3), Roman Pilipenko (1/4), Miras Aubakirov (0/1), Alexey Shmider (0/0), Murat Shakenov (0/1), Yegor Berbelyuk (0/1), Stanislav Shvedov (0/2), Mikhail Ruday (3/4), Altay Altayev (2/3), Yulian Verdesh (1/2). Coach: Dejan Stanojevic

Shots:

ESP: 19/28, 67.9%

KAZ: 10/26, 38.5%

Extramen:

ESP: 11 for 15

KAZ: 3 for 10

Penalties:

ESP: 3 for 3

KAZ: 1 for 1

MVP of the game:

Alvaro Granados (ESP)

Quotes

David Martin, coach, Spain:

“We just needed to pass this test without injuries and without burning too much of our reserves. This is the fourth match of the fourth day, all players are tired, and the most important games are yet to come, so this was just a ‘forget-quickly-game’ and now we have to focus on Croatia.”

Quarter-final: Canada v Serbia 5-20
Results & Teams

Game 16, 21.00 – Quarter-final: Canada v Serbia 5-20

Quarters: 2-5, 2-6, 0-4, 1-5

Referees: Adrian Alexandrescu (ROU), Kunihiro Sato (JPN)

CANADA

Milan Radenovic (11/30, 36.7%), Dusan Aleksic (GK, n. e.) – Gaelan Patterson (0/2), Bogdan Djerkovic (0/0), Nicolas Constantin-Bicari (1/9), Matthew Halajian (0/2), Geogios Torakis (0/5), Mark Spooner (0/0), Jeremie Cote (0/1), Aleksa Gardijan (0/0), Arie Soleimanipak (0/2), Jeremie Blanchard (0/0), Reuel D’Souza (4/5). Coach: Pino Porzio

SERBIA

Gojko Pijetlovic (7/11, 63.6%), Branislav Mitrovic (4/5, 80.0%) – Dusan Mandic (3/3), Strahinja Rasovic (2/5), Sava Randjelovic (2/3), Milos Cuk (2/3), Dusko Pijetlovic (2/3), Nemanja Vico (0/1), Milan Aleksic (2/3), Nikola Jaksic (2/5), Filip Filipovic (3/6), Andrija Prlainovic (2/3), Radomir Drasovic (0/2). Coach: Dejan Savic

Shots:

CAN: 5/26, 19.2%

SRB: 20/37, 54.1%

Extramen:

CAN: 1 for 3

SRB: 6 for 8

Penalties:

CAN: 2 for 2

SRB: 2 for 3

MVP of the game:

Dusko Pijetlovic (SRB)

Report

Though Canada began the event with a historical win over Hungary, the time elapsed since showed that it was rather an exceptional day for the North Americans and a bad day for the Magyars. Canada couldn’t repeat that performance against Japan and Spain and now they faced another mission impossible, a game against the Olympic champions. Furthermore, for less experienced young players should find it pretty demanding to play four matches in as many days – which tries even the best European warriors but the obvious signs were visible at the Canadians’ side that their reserves were not as substantial as would have been needed to withstand the pressure a bit longer.

At the end of the day, the three European semi-finalists scored 19-20 goals in their respective quarter-finals which highlighted the difference in players’ qualities and the depths of the teams.

Quotes

Pino Porzio, coach, Canada:

“Against Serbia our team could play without any expectations. We just wanted to do some parts the best possible but basically for this young team it was rather a good experience to meet the great stars of the sport. Serbia played with full focus as they need to keep their level before the most important matches and the difference we saw just shows the real picture.” 

Vlado Vujasinovic, assistant coach, Serbia:

“In this game our target was to keep our focus as this is the only way to be ready for our semi-final as the match itself did not mean a real test.”

The quarter-final day of the FINA Men’s Water Polo World League Super Final kicked off with a thriller in Belgrade. Australia managed to edge out the Hungarians in a penalty-shootout after a brilliant game, full of twists and turns. In the remaining QFs the Challenge the Europeans campaign didn’t bring any more success for the teams from the other continents, as Croatia, Spain and Serbia all won with big margins to reach the semi-finals.

Link
21Jun2019

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