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Athletes

Siobhan-Marie
O'Connor
Great BritainGreat Britain, GBR
Swimming

Biography

Further Personal Information

Date of birth
30 November 1995
Height
173 cm
Residence
Bath, ENG
Occupation
Athlete
Languages
English

Sport Specific Information

When and where did you begin this sport?
She began swimming at age seven, and first competed at age 10.
Why this sport?
"When I was younger I used to compete in gymnastics and really enjoyed that. I chose to pursue swimming when I didn't have time to do both anymore."
Club / Team
Bath NTC: England
Name of coach
Dave McNulty [club], GBR; Bill Furniss [national]
Training Regime
She has two sessions a day, except Wednesdays and Fridays when she trains just once. She swims 12 kilometres a day in addition to gym sessions.

International Debut

Year
2011
Competing for
Great Britain
Tournament
World Championships
Location
Shanghai, CHN

General Interest

Memorable sporting achievement
Winning silver in the 200m individual medley at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. (teambath.com, 10 Aug 2016)
Hero / Idol
British swimmer Rebecca Adlington. (bbc.co.uk, 02 Dec 2012)
Injuries
In the second half of 2011 and all of 2012 she had problems maintaining her weight. She was later diagnosed with ulcerative colitis that explained the weight loss. (bbc.co.uk, 02 Dec 2012)
Sporting philosophy / motto
"You get out what you put in." (swimming.org, 17 Apr 2014)
Awards and honours
She was named the Professional Sports Personality of the Year for 2016 in Somerset, England. (somersetasa.org, 09 Sep 2017)

She was nominated for the 2012 BBC Young Sports Personality of the Year Award. (bbc.co.uk, 02 Dec 2012)
Ambitions
To finish on the podium at the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. (skysports.com, 19 Sep 2017)
Other information
MANAGING COLITIS
She was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis after the 2012 Olympic Games in London, a condition she manages while competing. In 2016 she met the Great Britain rower Steve Redgrave who also dealt with the condition during his career. "It was one of the best days of my life. He is a sporting legend, so for him to come to talk things through with me made me feel so much better with what I have. It is not a problem. Everyone in sport has something to deal with, whether a long-term injury or anything else. I have an amazing team around me to control it as best I can. He just shows that you can do what you want. He has been through it and he is the best Olympian ever. It shows you can get through it, that was the biggest message." (telegraph.co.uk, 10 Aug 2016)