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Athletes

Marcelo
Chierighini
BrazilBrazil, BRA
Swimming

Biography

Further Personal Information

Date of birth
15 January 1991
Height
192 cm
Residence
São Paulo, BRA
Occupation
Athlete
Languages
English, Portuguese
Higher education
Business, Public Administration - Auburn University: United States

Sport Specific Information

When and where did you begin this sport?
He took up the sport at age 16 in Itu, Brazil.
Why this sport?
He was encouraged to try the swimming by his brother Philip, who participated in triathlons. He was inspired to take up the sport professionally after watching the Brazilian swimming team, including Cesar Cielo, compete at the 2007 Pan American Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “Watching that Pan Ams, I was like, 'that's something I want to be a part of! I want to swim a relay representing my country with my friends and my training partners.' So it was really special watching Cesar Cielo and some other guys. That gave me a lot of inspiration to start swimming and follow a swimming career.”
Club / Team
EC Pinheiros: São Paulo, BRA
Name of coach
Alberto Pinto da Silva [club], BRA, from 2018

International Debut

Year
2010
Competing for
Brazil
Tournament
World Short Course Championships
Location
Dubai, UAE

General Interest

Nicknames
Lelo (swimchannel.net, 16 Jun 2019)
Memorable sporting achievement
Winning a silver medal at the 2017 World Championship in Budapest, Hungary, and a gold medal at the 2019 Pan American Games in Lima, Peru. (g1.globo.com, 29 Aug 2017; swimmingworldmagazine.com, 29 Jun 2020)
Hero / Idol
Brazilian swimmer Cesar Cielo. (swimchannel.net, 16 Jun 2019)
Injuries
He experienced shoulder problems in 2018, an injury he had struggled with since 2014. (swimchannel.net, 16 Jun 2019; swimmingworldmagazine.com, 29 Jun 2020)
Sporting philosophy / motto
"What we do in life echoes in eternity." (cob.org.br, 19 Jul 2015)
Awards and honours
He received, as a member of the 4x100m freestyle relay team that won gold at the 2019 Pan Pacific Championships in Tokyo, Japan, the Brazilian Olympic Award in 2018 as the best swimming performance of the year. (esporte.pr.gov.br, 20 Nov 2018; esportes.estadao.com.br, 11 Aug 2018)

He was named the 2013 Southeastern Conference [SEC] Male Swimmer of the Year while swimming for Auburn University in the United States of America. (auburntigers.com, 2014)
Ambitions
To compete at the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. (marcelochierighini.com, 01 Jan 2018)
Other information
US EXPERIENCE
In 2011 he joined the University of Auburn swimming team in the United States of America, where he trained with coaches Brett Hawke and Sergio Lopez. "In the United States they are not so systematic as in Brazil. Here [Brazil] planning is more specific, while there is more general. I consider myself a fortunate person for having experienced both [systems], to know the best qualities of each one. [I also learned] how to approach what a swimmer needs to do inside the pool as well as outside. In the last year I grew up, not only in training but also how to deal with pressure in terms of my technique." In 2018 he returned to Brazil in order to treat a shoulder problem and to train alongside the entire Brazilian 4x100m freestyle relay team at Sao Paulo-based club EC Pinheiros. (swimchannel.net, 16 Jun 2019; metrojornal.com.br, 11 Aug 2019)

SOCIAL PROJECT
He, together with the municipality of Itu, Brazil, and a local social organisation, launched a social project called 'Nadando com Marcelo Chierighini' [Swimming with Marcelo Chierighini]. The project is aimed at the around 350 boys and girls, aged seven to 17, that take swimming lessons in Itu. “Inspiring kids and teenagers, by being a role model, is another victory that swimming is giving to me. Let's all create champions in sport and life.” (itu.com.br, 16 Apr 2018)

BETTER WITH AGE
He says that as he has got older he has learned to find more enjoyment in training. "It's weird because I'm getting older but I'm enjoying myself more and more. I'm enjoying practising. I don't want to train harder but I want to train smarter, I want to eat healthier, I want to figure out stuff for my body and adjust all the little details. And I'm really enjoying doing that. I enjoy the process of getting better. When I was younger, I was like, 'OK I don't want to do the little exercises before getting in the water to prevent injuries. I just want to go and swim and that's it.' And I didn't really enjoy the whole process of getting better, and right now, I'm in a really good spot.” (swimmingworldmagazine.com, 29 Jun 2020)