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Athletes

François
Imbeau-Dulac
CanadaCanada, CAN
Male
Diving

Biography

Further Personal Information

Date of birth
09 December 1990
Height
172 cm
Weight
69 kg
Residence
Saint Lazare, MB, CAN
Occupation
Athlete
Languages
English, French

Sport Specific Information

When and where did you begin this sport?
He began diving at age nine.
Why this sport?
His parents enrolled him in diving because he was always jumping and they were afraid he would get hurt. They believed it would be better for him to fall into the water than onto a hard floor, and therefore have less chance of hurting himself.
Club / Team
CAMO: Montreal, QC, CAN
Name of coach
Aaron Dziver [national]

International Debut

Year
2006
Competing for
Canada

General Interest

Nicknames
Frank, Frankie (commonwealthgames.ca, 03 Apr 2017; olympic.ca, 01 Jun 2015)
Hobbies
Hiking, kayaking, swimming, baseball, spending time in coffee shops, competing in dog shows with his dogs. (olympic.ca, 24 Feb 2016)
Hero / Idol
Canadian figure skater Patrick Chan, French figure skater Florent Amodio. (olympic.ca, 24 Feb 2016)
Injuries
In 2014 he tore a ligament in his hip. The injury forced him to change his power leg in the take off from his right to his left. (thestar.com, 10 Jul 2015)

He suffered a back injury at the 2013 Grand Prix event in Gatineau, QC, Canada. (fina.org, 02 May 2013
Sporting philosophy / motto
"Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." [Confucius] (olympic.ca, 24 Feb 2016)
Awards and honours
At the end of the 2013 season he was named Male Athlete of the Year by Diving Canada. (independentsportsnews.com, 17 Jun 2014)
Other information
CONDITION
He has struggled with anorexia during his career. He competed with the condition until he confided in coach Aaron Dziver following the 2013 World Championships in Barcelona, Spain. "Upon my return home, I was supported by a psychologist specialising in eating disorders. I would not tell this to anyone other than him. I was not comfortable to talk to my parents, I was not comfortable either with my friends, I was afraid they would judge me." Despite receiving help he admits the condition is something he will have to manage the rest of his life. "I have no more trouble, but I'll always have to watch it. In my head, I say to myself, 'Once an anorexic, always an anorexic.'" (ici.radio-canada.ca, 14 Jun 2016)

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