Water polo (M) day 2 - Nine-time Olympic champions lose second game in a row

London 2012 Water Polo

Hungary, a 9 time Olympic champion in men's water polo was beaten for the second time this week at the Olympic water polo competition. In today's Group B match Montenegro came out on top 11-10. On Sunday, the team from Serbia upset Hungary by an even wider margin, 14-10. The Hungarian team owns three consecutive gold medals from Olympic composition starting with the Sydney Games in 2000. The last time the Hungarians lost two consecutive games was in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics when they were on the losing end of a semi-final and bronze medal encounters. It is not often that head coach Denes Kemeny (HUN) throws his hands over his face, but as the final seconds of the game ticked away, his dream of a fourth Olympic title in London may have been in doubt.

On the brighter side, Hungary scored 20 goals in their two losses, itself an amazing statistic in international water polo. The team from Montenegro was never behind and broke free of Hungary midway through the second quarter and able to post a 6-5 lead at halftime. Early in the third quarter the margin grew to three goals, but twice the Hungarians struck back to bring the difference to only one, 9-8 at the end of the third period. Goals were traded in the final quarter but Denes Varga's (HUN) last three shots were all thwarted by goalkeeper Milos Scepanovic (MNE). Montenegro was able to maintain its one goal advantage, finishing 11-10. Looking back, Hungary's ability to score on extra-man opportunities could have been the team's salvation especially inside the final minute of the game. The Hungarian team finished with an impressive seven goals from 10 attempts throughout the game. Montenegro scored only four times from 10 extra-man attempts, but their action shots helped them win the game. Montenegro has now beaten Hungary a total of four times in 2012, most noteworthy was their extra time win in the European Championships semi-final game.

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Swimming day 4 – It's now official: Michael Phelps is the best ever in Olympic history!

London 2012 Swimming

altThroughout his awe-inspiring Olympic venture, Michael Phelps (USA) has accumulated two incredible records: the most gold medals (14) and the most gold medals in a single edition of the Games (8). One last record was missing for him to climb the highest march of the Olympic Pantheon: the biggest tally of Olympic medals. Coming to London, Phelps had 16 medals (14 gold and two bronze), quite close to Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina's medal tally. Between 1956 and 1964, she had accumulated 18 medals, a record tally considered unbeatable for many decades, until the appearance on the international swimming stage of a phenomenon named Michael Phelps.

In the fourth session of the Swimming programme at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, the US swimmer from Baltimore added two more awards (silver in the 200m butterfly and gold in the 4x200m free relay) to his unmatched roll of honour, collecting his 18th and 19th medals (adding to that his silver in the 4x100m free relay). He is now, considering any parameter of analysis, the best athlete ever in Olympic history, with a total 15 gold, 2 silver and 2 bronze medals!

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Diving day 3 - Chen (CHN) brilliantly revalidates title in 10m synchro

London 2012 Diving

altLike in the men's event, Mexico managed to be the best representative of the "rest of the world" against China in the women's 10m platform synchro, the third event of the Olympic diving programme of London 2012. Ruolin Chen and Hao Wang were naturally the athletes to beat, but as in so many occasions no one managed to beat them. Always very consistent from the first dive, this was an opportunity for Chen to revalidate the 2008 Olympic crown, this time with a different partner (at the "Water Cube", she got the gold with Xin Wang). This combination is not new and has been successful also at world level – in 2011, at the FINA World Championships in Shanghai (CHN), Wang and Chen also obtained a comfortable victory. It was the third gold medal out of three diving events at these Olympics for China.

"Four years ago, I was younger and with less experience. I was a bit nervous. Today, I feel more mature and more relaxed," declared Chen, who had also won the individual 10m event in Beijing. "Diving brings me something different. It brings something that most people cannot get," added Chen, visibly happy with this outcome.



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Water polo (W) day 1 - Spain upset world 2011 silver medallist China

London 2012 Water Polo

Olympic qualification tournament winner Spain upset world number 2 China by a surprising 11-6 margin in the opening Group A preliminary match of the women's competition at the Water Polo Arena on Monday. It was only two minutes into the second quarter when Spain took control and started to swim away from the Chinese. China earned a silver medal at the 2011 FINA World Championships in Shanghai. That margin went to 4-2 before China struck back to even the score at 4-4. From that point on the Spanish armada took over, going ahead 6-4 at half time and then 10-6 at the final break.

The stunned Chinese, who were late leaving the pool deck after the match were kept scoreless. The Spanish team, less experienced and slightly younger pressed home their advantage with Anni Espar (ESP) attaining her hat-trick of goals in the only score of the fourth quarter.

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Swimming day 3 - Agnel grabs third gold for France and Meilutyte first medal ever for Lithuania

London 2012 Swimming

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Another memorable session was lived at the Aquatics Centre on the third day of the Swimming programme. France got their third gold, Missy Franklin and Matt Grevers offered USA two more titles while the biggest revelation of the Games, Lithuania's Ruta Meilutyte, was the strongest in the women's 100m breaststroke. The surprise of the day was Ryan Lochte's (USA) fourth place in the men's 200m free.

Over the years, this has become one of the most interesting events of the Swimming programme. The old rivalry between Pieter van den Hoogenband and Ian Thorpe, then Phelps and Biedermann has created a solid expectation surrounding this race at every major international rendezvous. The Games in London were no exception. Displaying a very strong field (only Phelps was missing), the athletes to watch were naturally Lochte, Tae-Hwan Park (KOR), Sun Yang (CHN), Yannick Agnel (FRA) and Paul Biedermann (GER). The fastest of the semis had been Sun, world record holder in the 1500m free and winner of the 400m free in London. The Chinese star had, however, a bad start and was only sixth at the 50m mark, while Agnel departed fast from the blocks and managed to control his lead during the entire race. In the end, the successful member of the French quartet that had already grabbed gold in the 4x100m free relay on day 2, touched home in 1:43.14, much faster than Park and Sun, who shared the silver (and make their second podium appearance here in London) in 1:44.93. It was the first victory ever for France in this event in Olympic history and the third title for the country so far at the Aquatics Centre (besides Agnel's 200m free triumph and the above-mentioned relay, Camille Muffat won the 400m free). 

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