Shanghai 2011 - Synchronised Swimming


Russian duo wins tech routine, China repeats silver success

Shanghai 2011 - Synchronised Swimming

altIn the Duet competition today, first-time partners Natalia Ishchenko and Svetlana Romashina captured a third consecutive World Duet technical gold (and seventh overall) at Shanghai Oriental Sports Centre Indoor Stadium. The duel for silver played out between Spain’s Andrea Fuentes/Ona Carbonell and local hopes Xuechen Huang/Ou Liu, both presenting their first duo together. After a hard-fought final, the Chinese ended up on the second march of the podium and the Spanish took third.                             

Solo standout performer Ishchenko competes for the first time in the Duet technical with Svetlana Romashina, who already formed a winning combination with Anastasia Davydova two years ago in Duet free and tech. Appearing entirely focused and confident, the new duet partners performed a complex routine of rare precision and power. Their excellent performance earned them a total 98.200 points. With this result, Russia remains unbeaten in Duet for the fifth consecutive edition of the FINA World Championships.

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Ishchenko retains title in Solo tech, Huang home hero with silver

Shanghai 2011 - Synchronised Swimming

altFor the third straight world meet, Russia’s synchronised swimming icon Natalia Ishchenko clinched the title in the Solo technical routine on the first day of the 14th FINA World Championships synchro competition at Shanghai’s new sporting venue, the superb Oriental Sports Centre Indoor Stadium.

If the first place was virtually already reserved for the Russian world champion, the remaining podium spots welcomed two new soloists with a first success at this level: home revelation Xuechen Huang came second and Spain’s ever-impressive Andrea Fuentes, third.

The synchronised swimming competition started on a high note, celebrating its 50th final held in the FINA World Championships history. The Solo technical routine, a non-Olympic event, featured 34 countries, during which athletes must perform six required elements in a given sequence in only two minutes. Scores are given for overall impression and execution, with prominence given to the latter.

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